ABOUT SNADDER & SNASKUM
 In 1975, Magne Hoem, a young boy from Trondheim, was on a canoe trip with his friends. The group found a colony of mussels and cooked them up. Magne loved the taste. The next year Magne began school in Rissa. There he discovered optimal conditions for mussel production in Rissastrømmen. That was the start of a " not-so-little" adventure in Norwegian seafood history. Anyone working in the seafood industry in Norway knows who the Snadder King is. They also know that providing a high quality, reliable product is his main goal.
 In 1980, Magne established Snadder & Snaskum AS despite many local skeptics who believed it was a crazy idea to make a living by selling "bait" as food for humans. Mussels were not exactly everyday fare in Norway at that time. His business idea was based on harvesting mussels from Strømmen and then selling them to fishmongers and restaurants in the local area. Some of the sales also went directly to mussel-eaters in Trondheim. Magne first steamed his mussels over a liquid-fuel burner. He later used a wood-fired shell oven of his own design. That oven is still used on special occasions.
 During the first six years, all production happened under the open skies. Then in 1986, the first packing facilities were ready. Before this time, all harvesting, washing, cleaning and packing was done utilizing very simple tools. Transport was nothing more than a little wooden boat. The mussels were brought up from the ocean using a self-designed mussel-fork that was created by welding together several manure forks. The shellfish were then washed and rinsed in a cement mixer. Once clean, they were submerged in Trondheimfjord to recover from the harvesting and rid themselves of any bacteria. This process happened with help of a homemade rope system several kilometers from the site of harvest.
 After recovering in the sea, the mussels were brought back up and packed into styrofoam crates by the side of the road. The crates were loaded onto the Snadder truck and transported into Trondheim. The first year, in 1980, three tons of mussels were produced. Magne had to hire several assistants to help him during the first few years. Then in the middle of the 80s, brothers Rune and Steinar Bredesen were employed. They still work at the company today. Magne, Rune and Steinar are current leaders in the shellfish field, possessing much of the competence about mussel farming in Norway.

Today's bottom-cultured shells from Strømmen are still harvested in the same manner. In addition, the company now grows rope-cultured mussels using modern technology. Rope-cultured mussels are the larger part of current production. The packing facilities have been upgraded several times since the beginning, and meet all the modern demands of food production. Today, the company of 13 employees produces over 600 tons of mussels each year for the pleasure and satisfaction mussel-eaters at home and abroad.
Magne working the wood-fired shell oven in Trondheim.  A huge number of free samples were passed out, in the hopes of opening people’s eyes to mussels as both party food and everyday fare.
Magne working the wood-fired shell oven in Trondheim. A huge number of free samples were passed out, in the hopes of opening people’s eyes to mussels as both party food and everyday fare.
The shellfish were placed in a cement mixer that brushed and washed them.  Though this has been modernized now, the early process was vital for building up the knowledge that has made that today’s mussels of the highest class.
The shellfish were placed in a cement mixer that brushed and washed them. Though this has been modernized now, the early process was vital for building up the knowledge that has made that today’s mussels of the highest class.
A tough start on a cold winter day.  Even today, the boats must occasionally be chopped free from the ice before harvesting can begin.
A tough start on a cold winter day. Even today, the boats must occasionally be chopped free from the ice before harvesting can begin.
It isn’t easy to row a boat when the river is covered in ice, but people demand their mussels! Reliable delivery is one of our key goals.
It isn’t easy to row a boat when the river is covered in ice, but people demand their mussels! Reliable delivery is one of our key goals.
There is always space for a little bit more in the boat.  Good physical condition was necessary for both harvesting and transporting.
There is always space for a little bit more in the boat. Good physical condition was necessary for both harvesting and transporting.
Before unloading the boats, the snow must be shoveled.  It is easy to understand the joy of finally moving the packing process inside in 1986.
Before unloading the boats, the snow must be shoveled. It is easy to understand the joy of finally moving the packing process inside in 1986.
The Snadder truck is on its way to the rope system to submerge the shellfish for wet-storage.
The Snadder truck is on its way to the rope system to submerge the shellfish for wet-storage.
The Snadder truck is being loaded at the provisional outdoor “packing facilities” by the side of the road before its departure for Trondheim.
The Snadder truck is being loaded at the provisional outdoor “packing facilities” by the side of the road before its departure for Trondheim.
The Bredesen brothers in action in Strømmen.  Steinar is lowering the fork to the waiting Snadder shells while Rune prepares to hoist up the catch into the boat.
The Bredesen brothers in action in Strømmen. Steinar is lowering the fork to the waiting Snadder shells while Rune prepares to hoist up the catch into the boat.
After the mussels are collected from the sea, they are loaded into the truck and transported to the packing facility.
After the mussels are collected from the sea, they are loaded into the truck and transported to the packing facility.